Gleason Barn

Tag Archives: Chardonnay



Vineyard Profile: Stiling Vineyard

on March 25, 2013

With the beautiful weather we have been enjoying lately (including a few, spring rain showers), single-vineyard Chardonnay has been on our minds—especially our newest Chardonnay from Stiling Vineyard.

This vineyard, located in Russian River Valley, is planted in the infamous Goldridge sandy loam soils, providing excellent drainage. The coastal influence brings daytime temperatures that allow the fruit to ripen slowly, while retaining perfect balance.

If you haven’t enjoyed the 2011 Nickel & Nickel Stiling Vineyard Chardonnay, now is a perfect time to pick up a bottle (or two) and toast the coming spring.

An aerial view of Stiling Vineyard:

Stiling Vineyard

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Potato Leek Soup with Sautéed Rock Shrimp

on March 22, 2013

This recipe from Executive Chef Trevor Eliason pairs delightfully with friends, family and 2011 Nickel & Nickel Stiling Vineyard Chardonnay. Members of our Nickel & Nickel Single-Vineyard Club will recognize this recipe from their March wine club shipment inserts. (Click here to view the online version of this brochure.)

Recipe-PotatoLeekSoup

INGREDIENTS
(SERVES 5–10)

Seasoning Salt:
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground mustard seed
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon ground fennel seed
2 tablespoons
kosher salt

Soup:
2 tablespoons butter
4 medium leeks, whites only, diced
3 medium Yukon Gold Potatoes, quartered, then thinly sliced
Salt and pepper, to taste
½–1 cup heavy cream
4 cups chicken stock
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ pound rock shrimp

Combine all spices in a small bowl to make the seasoning salt. Mix well. Place the rock shrimp in another small bowl and sprinkle with 2 teaspoons of the salt mixture. Mix gently. Reserve the remaining seasoning salt in a small, air-tight container and keep it with your spices. Cover the shrimp and place in the refrigerator until needed.

In a heavy-bottomed soup pot, add the 2 tablespoons of butter and diced leeks. Cook on low for 20 minutes, or until the leeks are soft. Add the potatoes and cover with chicken stock. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Simmer for another 20 minutes, or until
the potatoes are very tender. Add the cream and remove from heat.

Working in batches, carefully pour into your blender, filling only half way each time. Start on a low setting then move to high and purée the soup for one minute. Be careful not to blend the soup for too long as it will become gluey. Continue this process until all the
soup is puréed. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed.

Place soup back into a clean soup pot and reheat when guest arrive. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil to a medium sauté pan at medium-high heat. Add rock shrimp and cook for 1 minute. Stir and cook for another 1–2 minutes.

ASSEMBLY
For appetizers, pour hot soup into a pitcher then into shot glasses. Place one rock shrimp on top to garnish. For a first course, fill heated bowl with soup and garnish with 5 rock shrimp, or a sorrel leaf, for a non-seafood garnish.

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Summer Chardonnay Pairing

on July 9, 2012

A perfectly seared piece of tuna is as appealing to the eye as it is to the palate. The fish melts in your mouth, while also giving the flavor of the seared, robust outer edge. Combined with the creamy avocado mousse, the interplay between flavor and texture makes a perfect foil to the 2010 Truchard Vineyard Chardonnay.

For a printable version of this recipe, click here.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
1 tablespoon Sriracha (Thai hot sauce)
1 inch of ginger, grated
1 clove garlic, grated
2 tablespoons white sugar
2 pounds Ahi tuna, sushi grade, cut into rectangular blocks 2 inches in width
2 avocados, diced
2 teaspoons yuzu juice (Japanese citrus found in specialty stores)
1 tablespoon kosher salt
Fresh ground pepper
1 bunch red radishes
1 cup vegetable oil
1 package wonton skins, cut diagonally into 12 – 15 pieces
3 tablespoons rice or grapeseed oil
Salt and pepper

In a medium bowl, combine the soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, Sriracha, ginger, garlic and sugar. Whisk until the sugar dissolves, about two minutes. Place the tuna in a deep baking dish and cover with the soy liquid. Cover the dish and marinate in the refrigerator for two hours.

While tuna marinates, make the avocado mousse. Set up a food processor and add the flesh of the avocados, yuzu juice, salt and pepper. Purée until smooth and place into a piping bag. Refrigerate until needed.

Slice radishes as thinly as possible. Place into cold water until needed.

Place a medium-sized sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add one cup of oil and heat until hot. Add the triangular wonton skins one at a time to the hot oil, being careful not to overcrowd the pan. Fry until golden in color, adjusting the heat as you go. Remove from oil with tongs or a slotted spoon and place on a plate covered with paper towels. Continue this process until all wontons are fried.

Remove tuna from marinade and pat dry with cloth. Season lightly with salt and pepper.

Place a sauté pan on medium-high heat. Add rice or grape seed oil. When oil appears to be almost smoking, add the fish to the pan. It is very important not to overcook the fish, but the pan should be very hot to achieve a beautiful sear. Sear each side for 30 seconds to a minute, using tongs to turn the fish. Remove from pan when all four sides are seared, leaving the interior of the fish raw. Chill the fish until cool to the touch, five to ten minutes, and slice very thin.

To assemble, lay fried wontons on a plate, top with a slice of tuna, then pipe a teaspoon of avocado mousse onto the tuna and garnish with a slice of radish.

Makes 12 – 15 hors d’oeuvre portions

For a printable version of this recipe, click here.

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Wine & Song

on April 18, 2012

Let’s face it: it’s not every day that we get to host a superstar band for an intimate performance in the Barrel Cellar. But Thursday, April 12, was such a day.

Guests of Live in the Vineyard  gathered in the Gleason Barn for tastes of 2010 Truchard Chardonnay before moving to the South Fermentation barn for a selection of Single-Vineyard Cabernets, delicious appetizers and cheeses.

Crispy pork belly wonton with sour cherry chow chow, Saba dressing and micro cilantro—just one of the beautiful hors d’oeuvres coming from Chef Trevor Eliason’s kitchen.

The band Fun. is currently at the top of Billboard’s and iTunes’ charts—and with good reason. The sound of their music filled the Barrel Cellar—resonant vocals, expert keyboard and deft guitar. We, the lucky audience, were captivated from the first note.

Fun.’s lead vocalist, Nate Ruess

Following the concert, guests mingled in the Gleason Barn, sipping on 2006 Dolce  and assorted bite-sized tarts. And when Fun. came out for a meet-and-greet, you can bet there were plenty who gathered to get their photos snapped with the band.

Guests greet Fun. in the historic Gleason Barn

Many thanks to Fun., Live in the Vineyard and to all who joined us for this stellar experience!

 

(Photo credit: Clifford Grodin/Access Bay Area Magazine)

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Garden-to-Kitchen

on March 1, 2012

What little winter we had here in Napa Valley is quickly slipping away from us, and spring is nipping at our heels. Tulips and daffodils peak through the earth after their long slumber displaying springs vibrant colors all around Nickel & Nickel.

This year we have decided to dedicate the entire garden at Nickel & Nickel to fresh herbs of every kind. Wonderful sweet herbs like tarragon, cilantro, chervil, parsley and chives, which pair so well with Chardonnay and are a great additions to any dish. Hearty, robust herbs like thyme, rosemary and oregano will make the garden an aromatic experience and are wonderful for marinating meats and fish. With our estate beehives awake and the bees hungry, our garden will soon be propagated and we will have delicious honey. Everyone wins!

Time to break out the barbecue that has been hibernating, open some Syrah or Zinfandel and grill up some nicely marinated meats and vegetables. We will be spending many hours with our hands in the dirt over the next few weeks getting everything planted, but the bounty we receive is so rewarding, it hardly seems like work.

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